pabloExercise has been touted to be a cure for nearly everything in life, from depression to memory loss, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s and more.
Continue reading “Why Exercising Makes Us Happier”

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The pleasure/happiness gap

Pleasure is short-term, addictive and selfish. It’s taken, not given. It works on dopamine.

Happiness is long-term, additive and generous. It’s giving, not taking. It works on serotonin.

This is not merely simple semantics. It’s a fundamental difference in our brain wiring. Pleasure and happiness feel like they are substitutes for each other, different ways of getting the same thing. But they’re not. Instead, they are things that are possible to get confused about in the short run, but in the long run, they couldn’t be more different.

Both are cultural constructs. Both respond not only to direct, physical inputs (chemicals, illness) but more and more, to cultural ones, to the noise of comparisons and narratives.

Source: Seth’s Blog: The pleasure/happiness gap

@DavidAmerland on How Neuroscience Is Helping Us Understand Ourselves Better

Here’s a truism: If you can’t analyze it, you can’t measure it. If you can’t measure it, you can’t improve it. If you can’t improve it, you can’t understand it. Apply this to pretty much anything, it is probably applicable to everything and never more so than when it comes to the brain. Long regarded as a hermetically sealed black box we could never hope to peer into the brain has turned into the latest arena where established companies, hot startups and even national armies, look to for a competitive advantage. The reason for this is because we have finally understood that everything is data. What your senses report is data. What your brain makes of the world around you is data. What you do and how you do it is data. And the impact your every action and inaction has is data too. This page, how it was created and how it is being transmitted is data. Your accessing it is data and what you will do after you have finished reading it is, you guessed it, data. Source: David Amerland on Google

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